Category Archives: ENGLISH

repression


started with a cage containing five monkeys. Inside the cage, they hung a banana on a string with a set of stairs placed under it. Before long, a monkey went to the stairs and started to climb towards the banana. As soon as he started up the stairs, the psychologists sprayed all of the other monkeys with ice cold water. After a while, another monkey made an attempt to obtain the banana. As soon as his foot touched the stairs, all of the other monkeys were sprayed with ice cold water. It wasn’t long before all of the other monkeys would physically prevent any monkey from climbing the stairs.
Now, the psychologists shut off the cold water, removed one monkey from the cage and replaced it with a new one. The new monkey saw the banana and started to climb the stairs. To his surprise and horror, all of the other monkeys attacked him. After another attempt and attack, he discovered that if he tried to climb the stairs, he would be assaulted. Next they removed another of the original five monkeys and replaced it with a new one. The newcomer went to the stairs and was attacked. The previous newcomer took part in the punishment with enthusiasm! Likewise, they replaced a third original monkey with a new one, then a fourth, then the fifth. Every time the newest monkey tried to climb the stairs, he was attacked. The monkeys had no idea why they were not permitted to climb the stairs or why they were beating any monkey that tried. After replacing all the original monkeys, none of the remaining monkeys had ever been sprayed with cold water. Nevertheless, no monkey ever again approached the stairs to try for the banana. Why not? Because as far as they know that’s the way it’s always been around here.

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LEGACY


THERE IS NOT LEGACY without honesty.

There is not honesty without laws following reality, without justicy for all, the rules to live honestly which is the requisite for José Martí’s dream for humanity.

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i came from


I come from a communist country and though my parents got me out of there when I was four I heard enough stories to be very grateful that they got me out of there. I have a lot of family still there who I keep in touch with and again thank goodness I’m here and not there. Unless you you want to be stripped of all your freedoms and have the government control your life you wouldn’t like it. Unless you want no choices on laws passed and voting rights you wouldn’t like it. Unless you want to never advance in your field, run your own business and travel where ever you want you wouldn’t like it. Sure free medical but how free is it when you have to wait a year for an MRI? People who haven’t lived it will never understand it. Sure if the communists running the country was a great man looking out for his country then he wouldn’t be afraid of free elections so since people have no say in who’s running it they do what they want

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i know:


Be WITH the person you love, that love you too. This is the most important fact ever. Be sure it is Love, do not be ignorant on Love facts and also:

  • eat well (avoid sugar, salt, animal fat, dairy, gluten, diet drinks… On the other hand Eat nuts, vegetables, fish, BBQ…)

  • exercise: do whatever is possible for u during at least 5 min bit do it well; if you can do it for an hour, great! Do it before 6:00 PM so that you can cool down and sleep

  • Relax;

  • Sleep well;

  • Avoid worries;

  • Do good, be confident u r doing good;

  • Do what u love and make love;

  • Do not take anything so serious;

  • Change what u can and leave what u can not if it is killing u;

  • Treat any addiction, do not exagerate on nothing, be far from any extreme and The peace will be with U. Nothing will disturb u mostly if u know that a ship only can be sank if the water get inside it. Do not attach to anything. Let all go but hope and good thoughts.

Do not believe in what doctors recommend blindly. read, look for others opinions

Learn what are the good sources to believe (internet sites, persons, publications) most recommendation are opinions not science. It’s science to do what is needed to detect cancer early (uterus, colon, prostate, skin,lung) and to determine your lipids (fat) in blood and to know what is your family hereditary condition. Keep your blood presure under 120/80 or as low as your age and medical conditions allow you… The secret is to be in control. check those parameters at least once yearly if always are normal and you feel ok but follow weekly or montly the one that went wrong but above all be happy and relax, sleep and eat well… Happiness produce substances that cure most problems. It is true.

Is easy to know what to do. The difficult is to do it.

Source: Medicine has been my bussiness in 5 countries over the last 25 years.

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Evidence suggests that educational attainment may be one of the strongest correlates of life expectancy


Although U.S. life expectancy has seen significant extensions over the last century, the rate of increase has been falling behind other wealthy countries, and these trends have been worsening over the last 30 years. In addition, the United States spends considerably more on health care in comparison with major trading competitors. Most policy approaches for enhancing health focus on increasing expenditures for medical care. Yet, medical care explains only about 10% of the variance in health outcomes, whereas behavioral and social factors outside of health care explain nearly 50%. Evidence suggests that educational attainment may be one of the strongest correlates of life expectancy. As a baseline, cancer screening and optimizing established risk factors for premature death typically extend life expectancy by less than 1 year. In contrast, remediating the health disparity associated with low educational attainment might enhance life expectancy by up to a decade. Amassing persuasive evidence on the health benefits of interventions to improve educational attainment will be challenging. To address this issue, a robust program of systematic research is needed.


http://m.bbs.sagepub.com/content/1/1/189.abstract

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All Cubans have the same Apostle of Freedom, we share same meaning for “Apostle” but each Cuban has a different understanding of “Freedom” and that is why we are united but separated and Castroism will never be the answer, every Cuban knows that too


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Millions of individuals trust the National Sleep Foundation for its sleep duration recommendations. As the voice for sleep health it is the NSF’s responsibility to make sure that our recommendations are supported by the most rigorous science


We at the National Sleep Foundation make it our mission to champion not only sleep science, but sleep health for the individual. And so, on thed eve of our 25 th anniversary, we are releasing the results of a world-class study that took more than two years of research to complete – an update to our most-cited guidelines on how much sleep you really need at each age.

Eighteen leading scientists and researchers came together to form the National Sleep Foundation’s expert panel tasked with updating the official recommendations. The panelists included six sleep specialists and representatives from leading organizations including the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Association of Anatomists, American College of Chest Physicians, American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American Geriatrics Society, American Neurological Association, American Physiological Society, American Psychiatric Association, American Thoracic Society, Gerontological Society of America, Human Anatomy and Physiology Society, and Society for Research in Human Development. The panelists participated in a rigorous scientific process that included reviewing over 300 current scientific publications and voting on how much sleep is appropriate throughout the lifespan.

“Millions of individuals trust the National Sleep Foundation for its sleep duration recommendations. As the voice for sleep health it is the NSF’s responsibility to make sure that our recommendations are supported by the most rigorous science,” says Charles Czeisler, MD, PhD, chairman of the board of the National Sleep Foundation and chief of sleep medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, “Individuals, particularly parents, rely on us for this information.”

How Much Sleep Do You Need?

Though research cannot pinpoint an exact amount of sleep need by people at different ages, our new chart, which features minimum and maximum ranges for health as well as “recommended” windows, identifies the “rule-of-thumb” amounts experts agree upon.

Nevertheless, it’s important to pay attention to your own individual needs by assessing how you feel on different amounts of sleep.

Are you productive, healthy and happy on seven hours of sleep? Or does it take you nine hours of quality ZZZs to get you into high gear?
Do you have health issues such as being overweight? Are you at risk for any disease?
Are you experiencing sleep problems ?
Do you depend on caffeine to get you through the day?
Do you feel sleepy when driving ?
These are questions that must be asked before you can find the number that works for you.

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Let us sing today the hymn of life. Yesterday I heard it from the earth itself, as I came, through the darkening day, to this faithful town. Up toward those tattered clouds stretched a single pine tree, defying the storm, raising its crown to the sky. The sun broke suddenly over a clearing, and there, by that sudden flash of light, I saw arising from the yellowed grass, from among the blackened trunks of the fallen, the joyful shoots of the new pines


. That is what we are: new pines. José Martí

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“You have all been through quite an ordeal. As such, your exam is short and simple


.

The professor, frowning, says “Well? You’re late…”

The students respond “We are so sorry professor, we had a flat tire on our way here and by the time we changed it and resumed our trip, we weren’t going to make it on time. Could you find it in your heart to give us a chance to take the final on another day?”

After pausing for what seemed to be an eternity, the professor’s frown melted away, and a smile crept across his face.

“You shall have your chance. Come to the exam hall in 3 days.”

The students thanked him and left the hall, in triumph.

3 days pass and the students arrive at the exam hall to find the professor waiting with that same smile, holding an envelope. He seats each student at one corner of the large hall and gives them the exam papers, face down.

“You have all been through quite an ordeal. As such, your exam is short and simple. In fact it’s only one question. You have 1 hour. Naturally, no talking. You may begin.”

The students flip their exam papers over and read the question in terror:

“You said you had a flat tire… which tire was it?”
Written 13m ago.

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it is my determination to not contribute one iota, out of blind love for an idea into which I am expending my life, to bring to my land a regime of personal despotism, …


130 years ago, in what amounts to a resignation letter, José Martí chides the boss of Cuban army Máximo Gómez for wanting to found the new nation “as one commands a military camp,” even as he regrets the need to chastise the general:

— What a shame to have to say these things to a man whom I believe to be sincere and good, and in whom reside the notable qualities to achieve true greatness! —But there is something above all the personal sympathies that you may inspire in me . . . and it is my determination to not contribute one iota, out of blind love for an idea into which I am expending my life, to bring to my land a regime of personal despotism, …

Over the past 63 years, Martí’s land has been ruled by such regime. Cuba needs to be free from any personal or foreign power but for the will of ALL Cubans. The ones that fight for it, are also Cubans no matter where they born. The result of their effort will be the only real Free Cuba.

Martí’s dream of a real Free Cuba is yet to come.

Let’s do it!

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I wish school would teach values and ethics and morality


From a reader:

Thanks for the post. I absolutely hated going to school. First and foremost is that I have a learning disability that I never knew I had and parents that felt it was the school’s job to teach me. Second I never felt that any of the information was relevant. It is only now that I’m my thirtys that I have a desire to learn some of these things. lol. But just out of curiosity and not for me to prove myself on some meaningless test. I wish school would teach values and ethics and morality. I wish it would prepare you for the future and not just you need to know this so that we can teach you this next year and blah blah blah .. there goes 13 years of your life down the tube. almost 20 if you go to a 4 year college. I do agree that everyone person should be literate. But beyond that I think should be entirely up to the person. What do you need a college education for in a company that has you fill out forms or interact with people?

People who succeed seemed to be people who are innovative or have a drive to go to the top with nothing stopping them (lying, cheating, stealing too). Nothing honestly in my life has prepared me for life.

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Too often the lectures they listen to are boring and irrelevant to their lives. And from my experience, most of this content is simply memorized, spewed out for an exam and then quickly forgotten.


By Shelley Wright

.

Hear me out. I’m not saying that our kids shouldn’t learn to read, or do math, or develop other valuable skills. But too often, the focus of our kids’ school day is Content with a capital C, with little connection to why it matters. Instead of learning together, many of our students spend hours filling in worksheets or copying down lecture notes that they could google in 30 seconds.

SCHOOLS VALUE HOOP JUMPING

For the most part, kids who we consider “academic” tend to be good hoop jumpers. They’ve figured out the system and can navigate their way through the predictable demands of the system. But they are seldom truly engaged. Rarely are they transformed by their learning. They’re going through the motions.

I’m an English teacher, and I subscribed wholeheartedly to the belief that the pinnacle of success in English was the ability to write “the essay.” But I’ve radically changed my position. I’ve come to believe that the traditional essay is one of the most useless things we teach our students.

Recently, I’ve started to ask people I know, “Do you ever write an essay?” I’ve never had one person say yes. I wonder how many teachers, except those who are taking university classes (or writing an opinion piece like this), ever write true essays. If I may be so bold, I wonder how many English teachers frequently write essays.

I’m not saying our kids shouldn’t be able to write. On the contrary, I think our students should be able to argue gracefully and persuade powerfully. They also need to know what they believe and why. I simply think the essay is a medium that has outlived its usefulness, at least in high school.

ACADEMICS FOR THE ACADEMICIANS

I’ve come to realize that being “academic” doesn’t tell you much about yourself. It tells you you’re good at school, which is fine if you plan to spend your life in academia, but very few of our students do. It doesn’t indicate whether or not you’ll be successful in your marriage, raising your kids, managing your money, or giving back to your community. All things that matter much more than being good at school.

School should be a place where kids can discover what they love. They should be able to ask the questions that matter to them and pursue the answers. They should discover what they are passionate about, what truly sets their hearts and souls on fire. They should discover they can make a difference now. Above all, they should leave school knowing what they are good at.

Today, I think most kids graduate only knowing if they’re good at school or not. Often our students have many talents; they just don’t fit in our current curriculum because their talents are likely not considered “real knowledge.” And what is that? In the Biology curriculum that I’ve taught for the past several years, one of the objectives that my students need to know is earthworm reproduction. Really? Out of all the things we could be teaching a 17-year-old about biology, someone (a whole panel of someones, we can guess) decided earthworm reproduction was essential?

OUR STUDENTS LOSE THEIR CURIOSITY

We are born curious. Babies explore their environments to learn; they do it naturally without being told. Three-year-olds constantly, at times annoyingly, ask, “why?” And yet, by the time my students arrive in Grade 10, they have all but lost their curiosity. Consequently, when I get a new class of students, we start by unlearning.

We begin by imagining what school could be, instead of what they’ve known for 10 years. Only then can we move into the work that will help them become lifelong learners who truly enjoy the search for answers, rather than the mark at the top of their exam.

Recently I’ve been reading Amanda Lang’s The Power of Why. In it she states:

“Curious kids learn how to learn, and how to enjoy it – and that, more than any specific body of knowledge, is what they will need to have in the future. The world is changing so rapidly that by the time a student graduates from university, everything he or she learned may already be headed toward obsolescence. The main thing that students need to know is not what to think but how to think in order to face new challenges and solve new problems.” (p.14)

LEARNING HOW TO LEARN AND FAIL AND LEARN SOME MORE

Our school system doesn’t need to create kids who are good at school. Instead, we need to create an environment that engages learners, fosters creativity, and puts responsibility for learning where it belongs – with our students.

Instead of rote learning, teachers need to use content to teach skills. We need to build environments that allow our students to get messy and build things. Places where students learn how to learn, and know how they learn best. Where students engage in significant research, and learn how to identify credible resources amidst a plethora of information that, at times, may seem overwhelming.

Furthermore, our students need to be able to problem-solve, innovate and fail over and over again. Throughout all of this, our kids should be collaborating with each other, as well as virtually with students across the globe. They need to be able to communicate powerfully using the mediums of print, photography and video.

THREE QUESTIONS TO GUIDE STUDENT-DRIVEN LEARNING

As I’ve worked with my students, we’ve come to realize they need to be able to answer three questions, regardless of what we’re researching:

What are you going to learn?
How are you going to learn it?
How are you going to show me you’re learning?
How they get to this last question is often their decision. And what they come up with never fails to surprise me.

My classroom hasn’t always looked like this. But over the past three years we’ve shifted to a constructivist pedagogy that has transformed not only my thinking, but my students as well. Now we learn in an inquiry, PBL, tech-embedded classroom.

The journey at times has been painful and messy, but well worth the work. The biggest lesson I’ve learned is that my students will often exceed my expectations, if only they’re given the chance.

http://plpnetwork.com/2013/11/07/obsession-academic-teaching-preparing-kids-life/

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“Patients think that they can ‘sweat it out’ at the gym, but when the body is fighting infection, it needs rest, not exercise,” says Dr. Neides. “And when we exercise, we raise our body temperatures, and plenty of the cold and flu organisms replicate at a faster rate when the body gets hotter.”


It was said that our body answer to infection is best at corporal temperature around 38 c / 100.5 F but now…

During exercise, the body also releases stress hormones, including cortisol, which can negatively affect the function of the white blood cells that help with immunity, he says. And that’s why going to work is a bad idea. “People who are under a tremendous amount of stress can’t attack the disease as well.

Dr. Neides doesn’t suggest patients with a bad cold or flu lie prone all day. Rather, he wants them to be as still as possible in a comfortable position. “One of the many reasons we recommend ‘bed rest’ is because when you’re lying down, the blood flow doesn’t have to work against gravity,” he adds. “But any position where you are calm and inactive is fine.”

That could mean reclining in an overstuffed chair, and not necessarily the actual bed, he adds. Sitting upright, though, can make dehydrated flu-sufferers dizzy or lightheaded, and can result in nausea, feeling worse or even falling over.

“If you have a fever, you are perspiring and giving off energy. That makes it easier to get dehydrated,” he says.

Down Time
Doctors typically recommend flu patients on bed rest increase activity from nothing to some as the body tolerates it, says Dr. Neides. Once a fever has subsided and a person doesn’t feel lightheaded or dizzy when standing, a little activity can be added gradually.

“One thing I tell patients is, for every one day you’re down with an infection, it takes three days to recover,” Dr. Neides adds. “So if you’re out of commission for two weeks, it will take six weeks to truly get back to your baseline level of energy.”

Ways to get back to health include minimizing exposure, staying nutritionally well-balanced and hydrated, and not exacerbating the illness by attempting to maintain normal activity. All that leads back to staying home and doing very little.

“Whatever the organism is—bacterial, viral—it does demand energy from your body,” says Dr. Neides. “Bed rest can mean a range of things, but what we really want is for you to rest and to stay away from other people. It’s a public health issue. When I tell you ‘no exposure,’ I mean it.”

Special Cases
There are rare instances when a bed-rest recommendation means actually staying in bed all day. “If a doctor is concerned about preterm labor, bed rest means you cannot stand up more than several minutes every hour because the risk of inducing contractions would increase,” says the family medicine practitioner.

“Another example of prone bed rest would be after retinal-detachment surgery, when a gas bubble is injected into the back of the eye, like a pressure bandage. You have to be face down for about three weeks and you can stand maybe five minutes every two to three hours.”

http://www.wsj.com/articles/fighting-the-flu-when-you-need-to-stay-home-and-in-bed-1423504355?reflink=linehome

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Only One Sale, so you are fired!!!



His first day on the job was rough, but he got through it. After the store was locked up, the boss came down to the sales floor.
“How many customers bought something from you today?” The kid frowns and looks at the floor and mutters, “One”. The boss says “Just one?!!? Our sales people average sales to 20 to 30 customers a day.

That will have to change, and soon, if you’d like to continue your employment here. We have very strict standards for our sales force here in USA . One sale a day might have been acceptable in India , but you’re not in the mines anymore, son.”

The kid took his beating, but continued to look at his shoes, so the boss felt kinda bad for chewing him out on his first day. He asked (semi-sarcastic ally), “So, how much was your one sale for?”

The kid looks up at his boss and says “$101,237.65″.
The boss, astonished, says $101,237.65?!? What the heck did you sell?”

The kid says, “Well, first, I sold him some new fish hooks. Then I sold him a new fishing rod to go with his new hooks. Then I asked him where he was going fishing and he said down the coast, so I told him he was going to need a boat, so we went down to the boat department and I sold him a twin engine Chris Craft. Then he said he didn’t think his Honda Civic would pull it, so I took him down to the automotive department and sold him that 4×4 Expedition.”

The boss said “A guy came in here to buy a fish hook and you sold him a boat and a TRUCK!?” The kid said “No, the guy came in here to buy tampons for his wife, and I said, ‘Dude, your weekend’s fucked, perhaps you should go fishing.

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not only free information but free food for all


Manama: Saudi and Gulf citizens have heaped praise on a man who placed a refrigerator in front of his house in the northern Saudi city of Hail and invited people to donate food to help the needy.
The open air donation would spare the needy the “shame” of asking for food, the man, who was not named, said.
The move came to national and international attention after a religious scholar, Shaikh Mohammad Al Araifi, paid tribute on his Twitter account to “the Saudi man from Hail who was engaged in an indirect act of charity.”
Writing under the moniker of “Sniper”, an online user applauded the “simple, but far-reaching idea.”
“That is exactly what we needed: A simple, but bright idea that goes a long way in helping people,” Sniper posted. “The idea should now be adopted and all large mosques in the country should place fridges to take and distribute food,” he said.
Another blogger, Abdul Rahman, went further by suggesting “the smart idea should be applied in front of all houses.”
“It is the best way to ensure that all people have access to food,” he said.

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24-year-old JOB INTERVIEW


[O]ne day there came to see me a 24-year-old–man, come from [Mexico] seeking a faculty position. His demeanor was very proper, his appearance pleasant, and his manner of expression easy and agreeable. I liked him.

I asked him to tell me who he was and what skills he had for the classroom, to which he responded:

—“I am Cuban, I’ve come from Mexico, and my name is ]osé Martí. My teaching skills . . .

—“José Martí! I interrupted. “That name is not unknown to me: I’ve seen it as that of the author of a pamphlet that speaks of the torments that the Spanish government inflicts upon the poor Cubans it sends to the work camps in Africa. Perhaps . . .”

—“Yes sir, I am the author of that pamphlet and the martyr to which it refers.”

—“Well then, Mr. Martí, your twofold worthiness as a Cuban and martyr make you completely worthy of my sympathies: You may count on the position you seek.


the article on prisoners in Habana was written 6 years before in Spain, by 18 years old Pepe. 6 years he has spent in recovering from physical illness (sarcoidosis) and lifting his family from the poverty that has killed 3 of his 7 sisters. Now, 1977, Pepe is in Guatemala, Central American Country, for the dictator Diaz expelled him from Mexico in past December, as the Spaniard metropoly did from Cuba a month before. It’s April.

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Where there is no real cultivation of proper desire, who stands to gain, really?


What is the first law of teaching, and the last? I think it is that you have to try to make them want what you’re trying to give them. There are many other things, specially when it come to actually giving what you give, but at the moment I think this is the one that draws the line between a good and a bad teacher. The teacher that made me want the thing, was good, the one that failed was not destined to succeed at teaching much. And I think that if you don’t realize this, you are bound to be bad as a teacher. A student who doesn’t need you to do that, who wants it already, will learn from you, and you can stick around in some disciplines and subjects. And bad teachers take it for granted that that’s the student’s responsibility, because who can reach into anothers heart? And they’re partly right, but no enought. I think you’re on the way to being far more successful of a teacher if you know you have to try to make them want what you’re trying to give them.

Of course there are the ethics of it, which makes me think of advertising–though perhaps that’s too much of a mix. Advertising is like evangelicalism, opportunistic about its means. It knows you have to want whatever you’re going to get, and it goes about it in the quickest way. But a teacher cannot be opportunistic. Opportunism is not wisdom, and at least teaching ought to be on the side of wisdom. Opportunism is a kind of insight about means, but without the corresponding insight of the ends. And there are ways of wanting, some of which get at the thing, some of which handle it a little while and then lose the grip of true lasting interest. Some ways of wanting are only about the subject that wants, and do not nourish in that subject a desire that corresponds to the object, but only a transitory and desultory wanting that is continually vitiated, and requires endless change or deeper perversion.


by https://unknowing.wordpress.com/2015/02/06/teaching/#like-5583

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we’ve heard too much on suicidal Martí, so let’s talk about the non-suicidal one


It is distressing to feel oneself so alive and full of tenderness and of undying kindness and to sob for hours on end,

—without my soul allowing me the right to release moans,

in this tepid atmosphere,

in this unbearable smallness,

in this monotonous sameness,

in this measured life,

in this emptiness of love that weighs upon my body, that overwhelms it, and that perennially suffocates and oppresses me within it.

Sickness of living: the sickness that killed Acuña*.

Rosario, awaken me, not as you did him, pardonable for his highness of soul, yet in the end weak and unworthy of me.

Because to live is a burden, so I live;

because to live is to suffer, so I live:

—I live, because I would be stronger than every obstacle and every force.

Letter sent by José Martí to a mexican poet for whom the poet *Acuña is believed commited suicide.

image

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80 billionaries have more money than half of humans (the list of several trillionaries is not yet available, thus nor how many humans have less money than them)


1 Bill Gates $76 USA Tech
2 Carlos Slim Helu $72 Mexico Telecom
3 Amancio Ortega $64 Spain Retail
4 Warren Buffett $58 USA Finance
5 Larry Ellison $48 USA Tech
6 Charles Koch $40 USA Diversified
7 David Koch $40 USA Diversified
8 Sheldon Adelson $38 USA Entertainment
9 Christy Walton $37 USA Retail
10 Jim Walton $35 USA Retail
11 Liliane Bettencourt $35 France Product
12 Stefan Persson $34 Sweden Retail
13 Alice Walton $34 USA Retail
14 S. Robson Walton $34 USA Retail
15 Bernard Arnault $34 France Luxury
16 Michael Bloomberg $33 USA Finance
17 Larry Page $32 USA Tech
18 Jeff Bezos $32 USA Retail
19 Sergey Brin $32 USA Tech
20 Li Ka-shing $31 Hong Kong Diversified
21 Mark Zuckerberg $29 USA Tech
22 Michele Ferrero $27 Italy Food
23 Aliko Dangote $25 Nigeria Commodities
24 Karl Albrecht $25 Germany Retail
25 Carl Icahn $25 USA Finance
26 George Soros $23 USA Finance
27 David Thomson $23 Canada Media
28 Lui Che Woo $22 Hong Kong Entertainment
29 Dieter Schwarz $21 Germany Retail
30 Alwaleed Bin Talal Alsaud $20 Saudi Arabia Finance
31 Forrest Mars Jr. $20 USA Food
32 Jacqueline Mars $20 USA Food
33 John Mars $20 USA Food
34 Jorge Paulo Lemann $20 Brazil Drinks
35 Lee Shau Kee $20 Hong Kong Diversified
36 Steve Ballmer $19 USA Tech
37 Theo Albrecht Jr. $19 Germany Retail
38 Leonardo Del Vecchio $19 Italy Luxury
39 Len Blavatnik $19 USA Diversified
40 Alisher Usmanov $19 Russia Extractives
41 Mukesh Ambani $19 India Extractives
42 Masayoshi Son $18 Japan Telecom
43 Michael Otto $18 Germany Retail
44 Phil Knight $18 USA Retail
45 Tadashi Yanai $18 Japan Retail
46 Gina Rinehart $18 Australia Extractives
47 Mikhail Fridman $18 Russia Extractives
48 Michael Dell $18 USA Tech
49 Susanne Klatten $17 Germany Cars
50 Abigail Johnson $17 USA Finance
51 Viktor Vekselberg $17 Russia Metals
52 Lakshmi Mittal $17 India Metals
53 Vladimir Lisin $17 Russia Transport
54 Cheng Yu-tung $16 Hong Kong Diversified
55 Joseph Safra $16 Brazil Finance
56 Paul Allen $16 USA Tech
57 Leonid Mikhelson $16 Russia Extractives
58 Anne Cox Chambers $16 USA Media
59 Francois Pinault $16 France Retail
60 Iris Fontbona $16 Chile Extractives
61 Azim Premji $15 India Tech
62 Mohammed Al Amoudi $15 Saudi Arabia Extractives
63 Gennady Timchenko $15 Russia Extractives
64 Wang Jianlin $15 China Real Estate
65 Charles Ergen $15 USA Telecom
66 Stefan Quandt $15 Germany Cars
67 Germán Larrea Mota Velasco $15 Mexico Extractives
68 Harold Hamm $15 USA Extractives
69 Ray Dalio $14 USA Finance
70 Donald Bren $14 USA Real Estate
71 Georg Schaeffler $14 Germany Product
72 Luis Carlos Sarmiento $14 Colombia Finance
73 Ronald Perelman $14 USA Finance
74 Laurene Powell Jobs $14 USA Entertainment
75 Serge Dassault $14 France Aviation
76 John Fredriksen $14 Cyprus Transport
77 Vagit Alekperov $14 Russia Extractives
78 John Paulson $14 USA Finance
79 Rupert Murdoch $14 USA Media
80 Ma Huateng $13 China Tech

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one in four unaware that the Earth revolves around the Sun


American said that a year ago. Based on previous reports, the U.S. made little progress — 71% of the people answered the question correctly in 2004, down slightly from 75% in 2001. At least we know that in 15 years no progress was achieved on this regard.

Also this girls believe that the earth was 2014-year-old 13 months ago:image

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In 2009, Mia Washington gave birth to twins with two different fathers, a one-in-a-billion occurrence


. One month, Mia released two eggs instead of one. Her two sexual partners each fertilized one of the eggs, resulting in two babies with two dads. In 2011, there were only 3 known cases of this occurrence

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NOTHING NEW YET | el cuartico está igualito


DICTATOR Raul Castro said in a Jan. 28 speech that Cuba would insist the United States return the Guantanamo Bay naval base as a step toward normalizing US-Cuban relations. Castro made the remarks during a two-day summit of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States.

So, obama, what u gonna do? Hahaha

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They beat the last 11 us presidents EVEN when 4 of them were for 2 terms


image

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A two-year-old girl who was born with a serious heart defect has had a life-saving operation thanks to a 3D printer


Mina had a hole between two chambers of her heart, but doctors were able to use the printer to create a model to help surgeons plan the successful operation.
Mina and mum Natasha spoke to BBC Breakfast, along with Dr Tarique Hussain who printed the model of her heart.

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when you realize the diversity of exceptional human beings out there and opportunities and business deals and everything, you’re going to realize there are a lot more options than you’re giving credit to


  1. Create a diverse network of givers.

Who should you be adding to your network in the first place? Generous people from a wide variety of industries, Levy says. Prioritize personality over perceived “usefulness.”

“It’s adding diversity to your network that truly helps it. The reason is, every time you add an additional person that’s in your industry, you’re not expanding your network very much because you all probably know the same people,” he says.

For example, Levy became friends with the founder of Wizard World Comicon, Gareb Shamus, someone completely unrelated to Levy’s industry. “Nobody would think that investing in that relationship makes any sense! He’s a wonderful guy, and one of the most generous people I’ve had the pleasure to know,” he says.

  1. Stay away from drama.

“I’m in full support of providing value and helping people who are struggling, but I fundamentally will not allow my network to be exposed to people who are negative and have the potential to bring them down. It’s insidious, and it spreads through the network very quickly,” Levy says.

  1. Don’t be afraid of making a fool of yourself.

If you’re serious about making a name for yourself, you’ll need to be willing to embarrass yourself in front of powerful people.

Speaking about himself, Levy says, “I think the only people who would probably embarrass themselves more over time are people who are far, far, far more successful. Like the [Richard] Bransons of the world.”

There are going to be times when you’re not going to appear as funny or impressive as you’d like, but as with anything else, you should make note of how your social interactions failed and improve the next time.

Levy actually plays with the way he tells stories and introduces himself either in person or over email to see how people react, and then adjusts accordingly.

  1. Don’t impose yourself on others.

“One of the fundamental mistakes I made at the beginning was thinking that people enjoyed all the things I liked,” Levy says.

He would take an “older sibling” approach and try to get his introverted connections to behave like him, an extrovert. For example, if he tried to get a shy person to retell a story he enjoyed in front of a large crowd, he ended up putting that person into an incredibly uncomfortable situation.

Whether you’re introducing people or hosting them at an event, you should always be aware that it’s not your job to get people to behave a certain way.

  1. Understand that not everyone will like you, and that’s OK.

“At a certain point, I realized that there’s a percentage of the population that no matter what you do or say, they’re just not going to like you, and it’s beyond your control,” Levy says.

“That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t work on yourself and develop yourself and learn to make people more comfortable, but at a certain point it’s like, what are you trying to accomplish?”

If it turns out that a coworker or even a childhood hero of yours doesn’t like your personality even when you’re at your best, then simply move on and spend time with someone else.

  1. Have a topic prepared to start a conversation.

Everyone’s been in a situation where you’re stuck with a stranger and neither of you has anything to say. So instead of talking about the weather or your commute, says Levy, “I always have a story of something I’ve been doing recently or a book that I’ve been reading.”

“Otherwise I hate the ‘interview’ setting, which is what happens when it’s like, ‘So what do you do? I do this. What do you do?’ That’s sharing facts, not insights. It’s not connecting,” he says.

  1. Tell a story that is clear and compelling.

When you tell a story, make sure it has a clear point and a punchline, whether it’s a takeaway or a joke. You should strive to be memorable when you’re meeting new people, and the best way to do so is through good storytelling.

  1. End conversations gracefully.

“I used to be absolutely awful, really awkward, at ending conversations,” Levy says, laughing. “The last moments of a conversation will define how people remember you, so you want to get really good at a solid ending,” instead of being rudely (or strangely) abrupt.

Over the phone, wait for a lull in the conversation and then give an indication that you need to be excused for something else or are happy with how the conversation went. Tell them it was a pleasure speaking with them and that you’ll make sure to follow up on certain points.

In person, Levy says he always takes an extra beat to make eye contact with the person he’s finished speaking with so that it doesn’t seem as if he’s running away.

  1. Keep meetings brief.

There’s no need to let an introductory meeting with a new connection last longer than 45 minutes, Levy says. And if you’re grabbing coffee or lunch, the ideal is probably a half hour.

“It’s better to leave the conversation having something to talk about and feeling like you need to connect again rather than feeling that the energy’s died,” Levy says.

  1. Be open. People are ultimately unpredictable.

You can’t be uptight if you’re looking to become a great networker. Do what you can to connect with people who are interesting, and don’t waste time with those who don’t mesh with your personality.

“One of the fundamental issues that we face as people is we are acutely aware of the things we tell ourselves to be aware of and then are aware of virtually nothing else,” Levy says.

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The fundamental element that defines the quality of your life is the people you surround yourself with and the conversations you have with them


  1. Appreciate that the most influential people operate on a different level.

If you want to surround yourself with executives and successful entrepreneurs, you first need to understand and respect that the lives of high-demand people are fundamentally different from even most chronically busy people, Levy says. Their schedules are likely filled with travel plans and meetings, with scarce free time dedicated to family.

“Everybody’s coming to them for answers. Everybody’s asking them the same questions millions of times. You can begin to think about, ‘OK, what is something different that I could provide this person that would make it worth their time to speak with me or meet with me?'” Levy says.

  1. Add value without expecting anything.

On that note, you should be thinking of how you can add value to a potential connection without expecting anything in return, at least immediately. Levy is a proponent of Wharton professor — and Influencers member — Adam Grant’s theory on “givers,” those who seek out opportunities to help people they respect and appreciate.

“If you’re a giver, then you build quality relationships, and with those relationships you’re exposed to opportunity over the long term,” Grant told Business Insider last year. “You actually increase your own luck so far as you contribute things to other people.

  1. Create memories.

Rahzel, former member of The Roots and beatboxing legend, joined the Influencers about a year ago and says that he’s amazed by Levy’s memory. “Jon can pinpoint people and the places and exact time he met them,” he says.

Levy says he’s boosted his memory with a simple trick. “For the most part our memory is visual, and it works based on novelty for something to really stick out,” he says. “If there’s somebody I meet that I really want to connect with, I try to create a moment that’s memorable and that can serve as tradition.”

This can mean sharing a special toast or asking a question that will elicit a unique response. For example, Levy met a Tinder exec recently and asked her about the first thing most people ask her. She said men who use the dating app often nervously ask if Tinder employees can read guys’ messages to other users. “Now I’ll never forget her!” he says.

  1. Make your introductions more interesting.

Most people just aren’t interesting in the way they communicate, Levy says. He thinks that Americans, especially, apply their efficient approach at work to how they meet people, talking in boring, direct ways about themselves.

“When people ask me what I do, I try to be a little elusive just to create some interest. So I tell people I spend most of my life trying to convince people to cook me dinner. Which is true,” he says, laughing. “A lot of my time is really spent around logistics, phone calls, and emails and all that. But the benefit of [my introduction] is that it sounds so different and then it’s much easier to connect.”

You may be better off delaying the job-talk for as long as possible. Levy has his dinner guests spend the majority of the evening refraining from discussing any aspect of their occupation, and encourages Salon guests to do the same, so that they can get to know each other personally.

New Yorker writer and author Maria Konnikova found this endearing when she attended one of Levy’s dinners and Salons. “At the Salon, you’re just enjoying the evening and figuring out which people you actually like, regardless of whether they can be helpful to you,” she says.

  1. Use the double opt-in system to introduce people to each other.

In keeping with being a “giver,” you should always be aware of which of your connections could be interested in meeting each other, and email is the easiest way to do so remotely.

Levy is comfortable connecting his closest friends through an email addressed to both of them, but he’ll use what Grant calls the “double opt-in” system for the busiest people in his network. If there’s a chance that the busier connection simply doesn’t have the time or desire to speak with the other person, a private email to both parties asking if they’d like to connect allows you to screen refusals without hurting anyone’s feelings.

And as Grant explains in an “Art of Charm” podcast, introduce people because you think they can add value to each other, not just because they happen to live in the same city.

  1. Befriend gatekeepers.

You’ll find that many of the world’s busiest people have assistants taking care of their emails, phone calls, and schedules. If that’s the case, it’s in your best interest to be on cordial terms with them if you’re looking to connect with their boss.

“If you can make friends with [the gatekeepers], you will be on their schedule,” Levy says.

He says that once he’s met someone in person and gotten their personal contact information, he’ll first try them directly the next time he wants to reach out. And if they don’t respond, he’ll try again with their assistant looped in.

“There’s no ego involved,” he says. Don’t feel slighted if you have to go through an assistant even after you’ve met someone. Whatever works for their schedule will work for you.

  1. Make cold calls.

To get in touch with influential people, you can’t be afraid of reaching out without precedent.

Levy recommends getting in touch with an executive sometime before 8 a.m. because it’s likely that they’re in their office but that their assistant isn’t. If you’re able to get access to their number, give them a call before their day becomes too hectic. There are databases like Who Represents that you can subscribe to that include the contact information of high-demand people and their gatekeepers.

And if you don’t want to use a database, you can try a free trick that Levy uses. Get just a single person’s email address from the company your target works for to determine the format (e.g. my email is rfeloni@businessinsider.com so it makes sense that my colleague Drake Baer’s email is dbaer@businessinsider.com). This sneaky tactic is actually how Levy recently got in touch with a Sony senior vice president.

Make sure, however, that if you’re reaching out you’ve actually got something of genuine value to share, as mentioned above.

  1. Write emails that will get replies.

Sending an introductory email to someone is low-risk because the worst-case scenario is that your message gets tossed and your name forgotten. But you can significantly increase the chance that your email will get a reply if you follow these tips, Levy says:

Don’t be a salesman. “I don’t try to convince them of anything in my message,” Levy says. “It’s not, ‘Oh, I think it would be really good to do this because of X, Y, and Z.’ [It’s] ‘This is what I do… I think what you’re doing is fascinating, and I’d like to sit down with you and talk about what you’re up to.'”
Keep it as short as possible. You’ll want to have the recipient take a look at your message and be able to give an adequate response, even if it takes them 30 seconds on their smartphone. When Levy emails a high-demand person like a celebrity, he keeps his email down to a single sentence that cuts out any trace of filler. If he emails an executive, who make decisions based on available information, he’ll limit his message to three to five sentences and include some links they can click if they’d like to learn more about him and the Influencers.
Offer a clear next step. If your recipient is interested in you, let them know how you’d like to take things forward by asking a question or extending an invite they can email reply to.
Entice them with your subject lines. If you’re being referred by someone in their inner circle, mention their name in the subject. Levy likes the subject line “Quick Question” because it signals to the reader that they can open the email and remain on a path to a cleaner inbox.
9. Follow up.

Be sure to send a quick follow-up email either later in the day or the next day after meeting someone for coffee or lunch. It’s proper etiquette that will keep you from looking like you’re selfishly using the other person.

  1. Organize your contacts.

If you’re looking to build a network on the scale of Levy’s, you could benefit from some simple organization.

Levy uses Google docs like a traditional phone book, but with contacts arranged by industry and ranked by the likelihood that they’ll do business together. He keeps separate lists for those in his Influencers community, potential members he’s reached out to, and those he’s interested in eventually connecting with.

jon levy

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Free knowledge promotes communism but in a very long run as so does the science development


Capitalism is to be completely exhausted so that a new class, with a high social awareness thanks to free access to information and development of social science and all technologies —over the next 30 years there will be more new graduated from university, thant were over the past 3 centuries— so that a new relevant conscience arises and rules the world in a similar way as dreamed by marxists.

It could be in 1 to 2 centuries one country at a time

•driven by new humans,

•when people is not longer required to work for surviving as there will be enough everything for all, thanks to computers and so. That way the men will be only required to work accoding to their skills and very well known development of their personalities and spiritual needs for no money will be necessary, you go to market or just order products according to your needs…


That’s communism. But the world yet is too primitive for all that. It is a complete nonsense to try all that now. That was what Marx said 150 years ago, and it will continue to be true for around that same time (150 years more)

Marx would be the Darwin for social science, if things happen according to his related ideas.

time runs against dictatorial systems like Cuban and Venezuelan today, for this is not the time to attempt such things due to the poor develoment of the productive resources. But 1 or  2 centuries the target would be all capitalist regimen, when no longer required to produce enough goods and a significant amount of new human wander about the world and take important possitions in the global chess game.

Some have already started.

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In the next 30 years we will be watching the maturation and contributions of Generation Z


 “This is the first generation to grow up with wide access to advanced technology since their birth. I have seen kids like my godson — born in 2011 — be able to navigate a tablet computer from before he was able to form complete sentences. I think that this type of exposure to super-computers, tablets, smartphones and social media since infancy makes their brains different, and as this generation comes of age and begins to take their place as leaders in society over the next 30 years, I think we will see mind-blowing advancements in every aspect of life that technology can affect.”

Ryan Coogler, filmmaker


I hope & work for the best. This generation achievements will 50% depend on what values we promote on them.

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what is widely known as the world’s largest annual human migration


If you’re planning to travel around China during the coming Lunar New Year, you won’t be alone. You’ll be traveling along with hundreds of millions of locals making more than 2.8 billion trips in what is widely known as the world’s largest annual human migration.
Between Feb. 2 and Mar. 15, droves of Chinese migrant workers, white collar workers and students will fan out from the country’s urban centers to visit family and friends in nooks and crannies across the country. According to recent government projections, this year’s migration will entail 2.4 billion road trips, 295 million train journeys and 47.5 million voyages by air. (Authorities didn’t specify what percentage of travelers would make it home in time for the festive fireworks, or even if they would arrive at all.)
To help ease the mayhem, China Real Time has devised a handy list of travel tips to help you stand apart from the crowd and stay sane during the travel-season rush.


http://www.wsj.com/articles/BL-CJB-25741

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WHAT THEY WANT: USA🔹 and CUBA🔸; the second🔸, the end of US punishments (“blockade, some immigration laws and support to disidents”), the fist🔹•••


US, wants to enjoy better relations with latinamerican countries, to pursue US’ interests that include promoting democratic values and economic affairs.

So that this guy came out with:

So, once again we, the U.S. Government, is seeking to impart our will of a free and democratic Cuba on another government and expect them to roll over and play dead. What ever happened to respect for other cultures? What ever happened to diplomacy? This is akin to me walking into your house and telling you that you must now eat as a vegan. Which finger would you flash at me?

***


…so that for this person the criminal behavior of Cuban dictator is similar with a vegan diet. So good, so well. That’s why things happen.

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socialism, why not?


I mean it in its purest and most basic natural way: freedom of talk about anything anytime, freedom to be wherever the person wants to be, freedom to move, freedom to study and work in whatever the person wishes, freedom to relate to others, any other person(s) anytime, anywhere… freedom to live where and how the person wishes…. freedom to…. freedom to…. freedom to….

Those of us who are fortunate enough to have freedom (at least theoretically) usually take it for granted, it is not until someone sees the real thing of an oppressive communist regime, for real, (I have seen it), that such individual values and appreciates each and every single form of freedom he or she has.

In the economic side of things, it is absolutely not sustainable that a government “owns everything” and “provides for everything” and “controls everything”

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life is so rich!!!


Ole lost his job and was having a hard time finding another. He saw a notice at the church he attended, that they needed a janitor so he visited the pastor to ask him for the job. The pastor was delighted and was about to hire him until they discussed the need for him to answer the phone and write down messages.
“I can’t read nor write,” said Ole.
“I’m sorry,” said the pastor, “but it is essential to the job.”
Ole gave up looking for work in Minneapolis and took a train to Seattle, where he got a job on a fishing boat. He did well and soon owned his own boat and in time became the owner of a small fleet of fishing boats.
One day Ole decided that if he had his own cannery, he could better control what he was paid for his catch so he looked into the matter and decided he would need a loan from the bank
The banker surveyed Ole’s assets and happily granted Ole a loan.
“Just sign the agreement and the money is yours,” said the banker.
Ole made his X on the dotted line.
“You mean you can’t write?” said the banker.
“I never learned to skreet my name,” says Ole.
“You mean to tell me you can’t read or write and yet you have built this entire business? Can you imagine where you’d be if you could read and write?” the banker exclaimed.
“Ya,” said Ole, “I’d be a Yanitor in Minneapolis.”

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A “potentially historic” storm could dump 2 to 3 feet of snow from northern New Jersey to southern Maine starting tomorrow


This Monday, crippling a region that has largely been spared so far this winter, the National Weather Service said.
A blizzard warning was issued for a 250-mile stretch of the Northeast, including New York and Boston, and the National Weather Service said the massive storm would bring heavy snow, powerful winds and widespread coastal flooding starting Monday and through Tuesday.
“This could be a storm the likes of which we have never seen before,” New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a news conference Sunday.
De Blasio held up a piece of paper showing the city’s top 10 snowstorms and said this one could land at the top of a list that goes back to 1872, including the 26.9 inches that fell in 2006. “Don’t underestimate this storm. Prepare for the worst,” he said as he urged residents to plan to leave work early Monday.
Boston is expected to get 18 to 24 inches of snow, with up to 3 feet west of the city, and Philadelphia could see 14 to 18 inches, the weather service said.
“We do anticipate very heavy snowfall totals,” said Bob Oravec, lead forecaster with the weather service in College Park, Maryland. “In addition to heavy snow, with blizzard warnings, there’s a big threat of high, damaging winds, and that will be increasing Monday into Tuesday. A lot of blowing, drifting and such.”
Wind gusts of 75 mph or more are possible for coastal areas of Massachusetts, and up to 50 mph further inland, Oravec said.
Airlines prepared to shut down operations along the East Coast, leading to the expected cancellation of more than 1,400 flights scheduled for Monday, according to the flight tracking site FlightAware.
A weekend storm that had brought snow and slush to the Northeast – the first real snow of the season for many areas – was just a warm-up.
“Looks like our luck is about to run out,” said John Paulsen as he gassed up his SUV in New Jersey. “I can’t complain too much since we’ve had a pretty mild winter, but I don’t know if I’m ready for a foot or so of snow all at once.”
The storm system driving out of the Midwest brought several inches of snow to Ohio on Sunday and was expected to ultimately spread from the nation’s capital to Maine for a “crippling and potentially historic blizzard,” the National Weather Service said.
The Washington area expected only a coating or a bit more, with steadily increasing amounts as the storm plods its way north.
At New York’s Penn Station, Cicero Goncalves was waiting for a train to Vermont, where he’s going snowboarding, because he expected the flight he had hoped to take would be canceled.
But the 34-year-old flight attendant from Queens – who was dressed in a full-length bear costume – counted himself and his travel partner as lucky. “We’ll get there before it snows, and we’re coming back when the storm is over, on Thursday,” he said.
Preparations large and small were in effect elsewhere in New York. A Manhattan Home Depot store sold about twice as many shovels over the weekend as it normally does, and transit officials hoping to keep the subways running smoothly planned to use modified subway cars loaded with de-icing fluid to spray the third rail that powers trains.
Farther north, snow plow driver Al Laplant expected to be out clearing roads of Simsbury, Connecticut, this week, just as he has for more than two decades. But even for a plow driver, the snow is no cakewalk.
“It’s kind of exhilarating,” he said. “But at the same time, I’ve been doing it for 27 years, so I’m kind of tired of it myself.”
The Super Bowl-bound New England Patriots also expected to be out – as in out of town – by the time the storm arrives in Boston. The team plans to leave Logan Airport at 12:30 p.m. Monday for Phoenix, where the temperature will reach the high 60s.


Associated Press writers Pat Eaton-Robb in Hartford, Connecticut; Bruce Shipkowski in Trenton, New Jersey; Deepti Hajela in New York; Albert Stumm in Philadelphia; and Marcy Gordon in Washington contributed to this report.

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Kenyan grandmother at school with her great-great-grandchildren


Ninety-year-old student: ‘Education will be your wealth’
*
Priscilla Sitienei has enrolled in primary school for the first time in her life – at the age of 90.

“I’d like to be able to read the Bible; I also want to inspire children to get an education.
“Too many older children are not in school. They even have children themselves.”
Gogo says she confronts children who are not in school and asks them why.
“They tell me they are too old,” she says, “I tell them, ‘Well I am at school and so should you.’
“I see children who are lost, children who are without fathers, just going round and round, hopeless. I want to inspire them to go to school.”

image image


http://m.bbc.com/news/world-africa-30944814?ocid=panws_all_smc_line_ed_gn__

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Your room gives you the perfect answer –



Roof says: Aim high
Fan Says: Be cool
Clock says: Value time
Calendar says: Be up to date
Wallet says: Save now for future
Mirror says: Observe yourself
Wall says: Share other’s load
Window says: Expand the vision
Floor says: Always be down to earth

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Families in Cuba are obliged to give notice to its goverment through the CDR (Committees of Defense of the Revolution), thus subjecting the whole country to a complete system of espionage, also funtioning in each school and job; with no Internet, no press, no television, no radio, no political groups,…



… but obama Hopes.

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There comes a time where you need to stop crossing oceans for people who wouldn’t jump puddles for you


. It’s important to follow your heart, but equally important to take your brain with you.

. It is impossible to make the same mistake twice, because the second time is a choice.

. It is better to be unique that trying to be perfect.

. Life is too short to be serious all the time. If you can’t laugh at yourself, call someone who will laugh at you.

. That tingly feeling that is experienced when you like someone is often common sense leaving the body.

. It’s better to have loved and lost than to do thirty pounds of laundry a week.

. Take the opportunity to smile while you still have teeth.

The quickest way to double your money is to fold it in half and put it back in your pocket.

To succeed in life, you need three things – a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

There’s a difference between being anti-social and anti-stupid.

. Moving on is much easier to accept when you realise the other person was batsh*t crazy.


If anybody needs me, I’ll be in the pub…

You can also find me on Twitter and Tumblr @suzie81blog and don’t forget to check out my Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/suzie81speaks.

From: http://suzie81speaks.com/2014/11/27/33-thoughts-for-my-33rd-birthday/

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Our education system has mined our minds in the way that we strip-mine the earth: for a particular commodity


She was six and she was at the back, drawing, and the teacher said this little girl hardly ever paid attention, and in this drawing lesson she did. The teacher was fascinated and she went over to her and she said, “What are you drawing?” And the girl said, “I’m drawing a picture of God.” And the teacher said, “But nobody knows what God looks like.” And the girl said, “They will in a minute.”
…our only hope for the future is to adopt a new conception of human ecology, one in which we start to reconstitute our conception of the richness of human capacity.

Our education system has mined our minds in the way that we strip-mine the earth: for a particular commodity. And for the future, it won’t serve us. We have to rethink the fundamental principles on which we’re educating our children. There was a wonderful quote by Jonas Salk, who said, “If all the insects were to disappear from the earth, within 50 years all life on Earth would end. If all human beings disappeared from the earth, within 50 years all forms of life would flourish.” And he’s right.

What TED celebrates is the gift of the human imagination. We have to be careful now that we use this gift wisely and that we avert some of the scenarios that we’ve talked about. And the only way we’ll do it is by seeing our creative capacities for the richness they are and seeing our children for the hope that they are. And our task is to educate their whole being, so they can face this future. By the way — we may not see this future, but they will. And our job is to help them make something of it.


By http://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_says_schools_kill_creativity/transcript?language=en

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Happiness exists on earth, and it is won through prudent exercise of reason, knowledge of the harmony of the universe, and constant practice of generosity


Happiness exists on earth, and it is won through prudent exercise of reason, knowledge of the harmony of the universe, and constant practice of generosity. – Jose Marti

the Philosopher Accountant

Happiness exists on earth, and it is won through prudent exercise of reason, knowledge of the harmony of the universe, and constant practice of generosity. – Jose Marti

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reconciliation or the Cold War all over again?


Contrary to popular belief, Obama’s change in Cuba policy is not an indication of his foreign policy brilliance; it is a product of America’s foreign policy desperation. After 2 years of very dilated negotiation between Cuba and USA presidentents, all of a sudden Obama decided to yield to Raúl propositions. Why?! The Russians have been making serious power moves in Latin and South America while American policies have been alienating countries like Argentina and Brazil. Over the weekend a delegation of Democratic Party senators lead by Pat Leahy met with Raul Castro to ascertain how to improve relations with the two Countries. This is not the action of a United States negotiating from a position of strength, but the behavior of a nation trying to catch up with its geopolitical challenger, the Russians. As stated in a recent article on the trip in the New York Times titled: “U.S. Lawmakers in Cuba for Three Day Visit”: “In the statement, Mr. Leahy’s office said the trip was intended to ‘seek clarity from Cubans on what they envision normalization to look like, going beyond past rote responses such as ‘end the embargo.’ ‘The office said that the trip would “help develop a sense of what Cuba and the United States are prepared to do to make a constructive relationship possible.’” By Leahy’s own admission, the Cuban’s are calling the shots and the United States is being forced to play catch up. Now the Cubans are in the old Cold War position many Third World countries found themselves in by being able to play the Russians against the Americans and ask one simple question: Which one of you is willing to offer more? It looks more and more like the Cold War all over again. *** https://alethonews.wordpress.com/2015/01/21/what-is-the-real-reason-behind-obamas-new-cuba-policy/

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Se pone celoso


You may think that jealousy is a very Latin male trait and you’d be right. But don’t for a second think it stops there. Mothers, sisters, cousins, friends, neighbours, you name it. Almost everyone here is jealous of almost everyone else.

It’s very subtle at first. I don’t really see it but it soon weaves itself into the fabric of everyday life.

Cooking has been challenging for me. I’ve had to learn to cook in one pan, on one ring, with one temperature (really hot), with limited ingredients. Besides, I’ve never really had to deal with raw ingredients in the same way they do here. But I’ve been determined to learn.

My first attempt was a couple of weeks after we arrived. I love to cook and miss the routine of cooking for myself. As my suegra works four days a week and gets back really late I decided to cook for her return so she doesn’t have to. She’s not been well and always returns tired to cook for us.

I bought beef steaks for everyone and my cousin and aunt taught me how to cook them Cuban style. We make tostones and rice to go with it. Although it’s a pretty simple dish I feel marginally proud of myself. On return my suegra refuses to eat it and sets off crossly to her house. She’s jealous that it wasn’t her that helped me cook and that I didn’t do it in her house. Se pone celosa.

After four months here with the sun beating down on my head I am in desperate need of a hair cut and something to soften it. It is as burnt as my skin in this heat but with no sun cream to soften the blow. I mention this in passing and both my suegra and my cousin offer their hairdressers.
The next day my cousin comes in and says a neighbour can cut my hair for me. We go then and there and it’s swiftly cut in the Cuban style. Later that day I show my suegra. ‘But I’ve talked to my hairdresser and she’s expecting you at 9am tomorrow’. This is rubbish but se pone celosa. She’s jealous. That I went with someone else.

It’s not just my suegra. It’s everyone!

I get my nails painted but not where my cousin suggests. I return and she tells me it’s an ugly colour. It’s not. She’s jealous that I went with another persons suggestion.

When we are in Havana we stay with an aunt and good friend. She has two grandchildren the same age as our kids who we visit sometimes. She’s an amazing help with Maia, making her food and looking after her for us. But this is infuriating for her son’s wife who is jealous of the attention Maia gets over her baby boy.

And so it goes on…

Kids jealous of other kids, women coveting houses, lifestyles, clothes. The gossip revolving around who did what, who has what. Gossip on how terrible the extension is on the neighbours bigger house, how they want to sell but nobody will buy. Tears shed over whether sons spend more time with mothers or lovers. Every time I enter a house someone’s belongings or lifestyle is being accused. It is described to me one day as a war. It seems quite exhausting.

After a while I actually stop worrying about it. I’ve seen the children play and this jealous trait is virtually cultivated. It’s assimilated as an acceptable, rewarded mode of behaviour. Kids gets jealous over everything. They taunt each other and fight over the have and the have nots. The aim of every word daily is to make others jealous, which all the adults think is hilarious and look at their kids with adoring eyes.

This then grows.

Kids jealous of other kids to women coveting houses, lifestyles, clothes. The gossip revolving around who did what, who has what. Tears shed over whether sons spend more time with mothers or lovers. Every time I enter a house someone’s belongings or lifestyle are being assessed. The more people have the worse it is. It is a war. A war for affection, a war for a peso, a war of want, a war to survive. It is impossible to be happy for someone else who has when you have not. It also makes me know fundamentally that am and always will be an outsider here.

Of course Diego gets jealous but that’s just the Latin male thing. It’s all the others you got to watch.

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clippedwingsflying

You may think that jealousy is a very Latin male trait and you’d be right. But don’t for a second think it stops there. Mothers, sisters, cousins, friends, neighbours, you name it. Almost everyone here is jealous of almost everyone else.

It’s very subtle at first. I don’t really see it but it soon weaves itself into the fabric of everyday life.

Cooking has been challenging for me. I’ve had to learn to cook in one pan, on one ring, with one temperature (really hot), with limited ingredients. Besides, I’ve never really had to deal with raw ingredients in the same way they do here. But I’ve been determined to learn.

My first attempt was a couple of weeks after we arrived. I love to cook and miss the routine of cooking for myself. As my suegra works four days a week and gets back really late I decided to…

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Poor perspective


‘The poor wash disposable nappies’, she tells me sadly as we sit on her sofa in the afternoon. The chairs are sticky with years and years of grime. They are waxy to the touch, the soft patterned fabric worn smooth and stained brown in colour. Every time I sit on them I feel the need to clean my hands and change my clothes. They smell of oil, fat and sweat all mushed in over many, many years. Her kitchen and bathroom are crawling with cockroaches. They live in the dark of her food cupboards. In with the pots and pans. They live in the oven where her egg pan lives full of oil to reuse later in the day. Sometimes after I’ve made eggs and coffee for breakfast I can feel them inside my clothes, crawling up my legs. I find them crawling over our toothbrushes in the bathroom if I forget to put them away. It’s dark in this house too. It was a collective house before the war and the floor she lives on used to be the kitchen (there was no cooking in the bedrooms), the next house along is where the games would have been. People socialised in this area and the keeper of the house cooked and maintained everything. It then became men’s only housing and finally, post war was divided up into housing. The problem is that some parts lack windows and are very dark. The rooms upstairs are tiny, with little ladders that lead to a platform for sleeping that has a very low ceiling. Kitchen have been installed with the little one ring electric hobs they all use. She contInues her conversation about my pampers, ‘They wash them and reuse them’, she goes on.

I think of my cousin in Camaguey who has been taking my pampers every morning and washing them. Carefully rinsing out the urine and hanging them to dry on the line. She will use them over muslins to act as a waterproof barrier to stop the urine leaking onto bedding and clothes. She says she is saving them up for when she gets pregnant again. I wonder if she might sell them.
A neighbour and good friend to me has just had a new baby girl, she has been boiling muslin clothes, which she secures with pins. She then lays an extra muslin on the cot to protect it from any leaks. Once babies reach four months old they stop wearing nappies (except at night) and start in pants, which are rinsed out. These people who have been washing out my nappies are horrified when I talk about the cockroaches in our Havanan house. They load me up with cloro, special creams in pots and strict cleaning instructions for their demise. They shake their heads disgusted and saddened by how others live. They can’t understand why someone would live in such squalor.

clippedwingsflying

‘The poor wash disposable nappies’, she tells me sadly as we sit on her sofa in the afternoon. The chairs are sticky with years and years of grime. They are waxy to the touch, the soft patterned fabric worn smooth and stained brown in colour. Every time I sit on them I feel the need to clean my hands and change my clothes. They smell of oil, fat and sweat all mushed in over many, many years. Her kitchen and bathroom are crawling with cockroaches. They live in the dark of her food cupboards. In with the pots and pans. They live in the oven where her egg pan lives full of oil to reuse later in the day. Sometimes after I’ve made eggs and coffee for breakfast I can feel them inside my clothes, crawling up my legs. I find them crawling over our toothbrushes in the bathroom if…

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Disconnected


You really can’t grasp how difficult staying connected is in Cuba until you’ve been. In Camaguey there are two places I can go to use the internet. By use the internet I mean use a computer with access to my email and a few web pages for one hour for 5 cucs. Internet that is slow, with a keyboard where someone, somewhere has moved all the letters around so I can’t find a comma or full stop. Internet where I hammer out barely legible two line emails that satisfy no-one. Photos that never download and an eternal circle eating up time whilst it thinks slowly about a simple command like page down. Internet for non-Cubans uses the old fashion method where you buy a card with a code to scratch off. This then activates one hour of usage per card.

A month after arrival I decide I need to email my family. To get into town we need to take a horse and cart and then change for a packed bus.

When we get to the place there is no electricity.

The next time there is no connection.

We try again a week later and there are no cards.

We go back a fourth time we are told there are still no cards, they are waiting for a delivery from Havana.

Diego appreciates my need to be in touch so he cycles around Camaguey searching for somewhere that might have cards. He comes back empty handed. Next he searches for someone who has private internet who might be able to access facebook for me. They get limited time though and everyone is using it.

This disconnected life is so unfamiliar. I know nothing of world news and can only send short occasional texts to the outside world. I miss birthdays, announcements, new arrivals. I am used to being so connected in the modern world this change leaves a lot of space in my life. I find I am more peaceful. I think more. I start writing on my phone, logging thoughts, finding a friend in my notebooks. I don’t feel rushed or nearly as stressed. The lack of virtual stimulus leaves me feeling rested, with more direction.

So it is that I find myself with time on my hands. I realise how peaceful my life is here, how much space and time I suddenly have. My brain is not filled with constant, useless noise. I don’t feel rushed or over stimulated. I don’t waste whole evenings cruising websites, shopping, looking at people’s lives from a far. I feel rested. Evenings are spent watching the kids play in the street or back to back episodes of Case Closed and The Voice Kids or some pirated American movie on a memory stick. We play games with cards and dice, I learn to play dominoes.

I start teaching English twice a week in the evening to a few of the kids in the street. Planning lessons on the nights I am not teaching. The kids aged 7-12 all gather in the house up up the road. They sit huddled together on the double bed that sits in the main room next to the TV. The bed-sheet a deep grey colour was once was vibrant with flowers. They all look up at me eager to learn how to greet people and name parts of the body.

Other nights are spent sat around the table chatting with a thimble of coffee for company. Sometimes we brave the Mosquitos and sit outside telling stories, swapping jokes and sharing our lives. The flow of people changing as neighbours drop in and out. Here we discuss superstitions, such as the bird you don’t want to land on your house as it brings with it a death, or not bathing after eating for fear it’ll stop the heart. Sometimes we go out and visit friends but that’s rare. Or sometimes I just lie peacefully reading, writing, thinking, listening to the world as it passes by and feeling a truer sense of myself in among it all.

It is on one of these nights my Suegra tells me about her childhood including the last Christmas she remembers having presents. She was eleven. Before then she tells me they always received beautiful toys, wrapped in paper. Toys that lasted. She recalls vividly that the last toy she had was a doll, with beautiful clothes. ‘We had such beautiful things. Before everything changed.’ They don’t give presents at Christmas now. Christmas is a few rums or Tinima beer on Christmas Eve. A small fake tree for a few people. A fiesta.

A few months later we head to Santiago de Cuba where, in 40 degrees of heat, we find an internet place with cards. I log on gleefully but it is short lived. After 20 mins of looking at my email and trying to open them to read I discover I can’t access my emails. It’s not working. My dismay at this point is palpable but there is nothing I can do about it. Now I’ll have to wait until we go to Havana. My card, which expires after 30 days, becomes a useless waste of money.

Six weeks later we go to Havana and finally, three months after arriving, I log into my email. But even here it’s painfully slow. It’s takes two hours to browse through three months worth of emails opening only important ones to read. I don’t have time to respond to any of them. I return two days later to respond. Three emails take an hour. I am limited to short, snappy hellos updating a new life I can’t explain. Quick apologies and a promise of more contact. I have wanted this contact for three months but instead of feeling invigorated I feel robbed somehow. A sort of loneliness starts to creep in. People here don’t understand me, my patience for superstitions is running low. I miss my life, my cultural norms, my routines. The ease of life versus the struggle here. I miss news, I miss wine, I miss potatoes. I need time and technology to breach the divide. Here, it feels as if I am locked out of life. Even with the relative freedoms I have as a foreigner.

Imagine a Cuban, with even less information. I’ve been asked how have Cubans taken to the news about relations with the US. The answer is complex but simple. They took to the news with a carton of rum in many cases. They are delighted, they know that it’s historic. They celebrated. It has led to a sense of happiness and optimism. But many don’t know what it will mean for them. There’s talk but life goes on the same. Rural communities in particular have no idea what this means for them in practical terms. They don’t have any outside contact. They don’t meet any tourists with tales of other places, new ideas, gadgets and news. They don’t watch world channels. The news they get is filtered through a lens. It comes from the perspective of their country and it’s values. They get other news from neighbours, many who have children living in the US or Ecuador. But really they are not informed about world trade and general politics to have any idea of what this might mean for them. They really can’t dream or imagine the future implications. They also don’t know what the world outside really looks like. Any change would take so long to filter to these parts it’ll make little difference in the short term except on the black market and the availability of certain items. In reality no one really knows what changes will happen, nor how quickly.

I start counting the days until we fly to Mexico. We fly to have a holiday and renew our visa. Also, to go to the shops and get some things we need like nappies, decent toothpaste, vitamins, sippy cups and toys. The all too normal but needed things we can’t get easily here. We are also flying to Mexico to log on, to skype and see friends and family, to email, to see pointless updates of what people ate, what their kids say, holiday snaps, news, radio, uncensored internet access, TV with hundreds of channels and nothing to watch. I am flying to be connected.

In Mexico, I skype everyone. Real conversations with free wifi from hotel rooms. I follow updates and statuses out of time – writing when everyone is long since asleep. I read news and blogs, I get answers to questions and research things to do with the kids. I download more games for Eleanor and TV shows in English for when we return to Cuba. In Mexico I start uploading this blog in dark hotels rooms with two sleeping children. I research wifi points in Cuba and discover for a hefty price I can log onto a wifi network in a few top end Havana hotels. An hour every now and again to download new emails and send drafted ones and of course to upload my writing here. Scheduling diligently with so little chance to come.

This remoteness has gifted me many things but it has also cut me off. I find myself connected. We are disconnected.

clippedwingsflying

You really can’t grasp how difficult staying connected is in Cuba until you’ve been. In Camaguey there are two places I can go to use the internet. By use the internet I mean use a computer with access to my email and a few web pages for one hour for 5 cucs. Internet that is slow, with a keyboard where someone, somewhere has moved all the letters around so I can’t find a comma or full stop. Internet where I hammer out barely legible two line emails that satisfy no-one. Photos that never download and an eternal circle eating up time whilst it thinks slowly about a simple command like page down. Internet for non-Cubans uses the old fashion method where you buy a card with a code to scratch off. This then activates one hour of usage per card.

A month after arrival I decide I need to email…

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About Robertico (part 1)


It took me almost a week in Camaguey to really see Robertico. This may sound strange but so many people pass through the house – tios, primos, friends and neighbours of all ages – that his presence has seemed passing like all the others. It’s only one morning as I am up early with baby Maia that I start to wonder why, at 6am, he is there. My aunt is making him a packed lunch and he is brushing his teeth. He is dressed in his school uniform, the standard deep red shorts and a white shirt. His young face freckled, and dark hair bleached from the sun. All I know about him is that he lives next door.

I start to ponder on why he’s here so early. Maybe they don’t have running water next door or perhaps he needs to use the fridge because they don’t have one. As if reading my mind my aunt makes a sign, putting her thumb to her mouth in a drinking motion.
‘His dad,’ she mouths. ‘And his mother disappears to the country and comes back when she feels like it.’
‘Where?’ I ask.
‘Another province, where her family live. She went and hasn’t returned,’ she replies.

I think back. Every evening he has eaten in the house, quietly in the corner. At the weekend he was there when we were making paper animals. I bought a book that shows you step by step how to make a jungle out of paper. Systematically and with considerable talent he made a snake and an elephant. He followed the pattern carefully, drawing the detail on his elephant’s face with a sensitivity I admired. I could see talent there. ‘Next week let’s make grass and monkeys,’ I said. The animals he made are lovingly placed in his bag for school.

The day before he had shown me his slingshot. Made from twigs, an old rubber glove and a strip of maize leaf tying it all together. He’d set about fixing it with a machete the same size as him.

I ask him later that day how school was. ‘Mal,’ he replies and goes back to sitting quietly in the corner. He has a board on his lap with his dinner on, a slice of chicken, egg and rice. He’s watching the tv. That night I notice that he sleeps in the same room as my aunt and uncle, in the same bed. I realise he’s been here all week, sleeping here. Mouse-like, his presence barely noticeable. I have yet to see his parents.

I mention how great it is that my aunt is there for him. ‘There is no blood there,’ she tells me. She means she cares for him even though she is not related to him in any way. The saddest thing for him is that it’s true. There is no blood there for him at all.

clippedwingsflying

It took me almost a week in Camaguey to really see Robertico. This may sound strange but so many people pass through the house – tios, primos, friends and neighbours of all ages – that his presence has seemed passing like all the others. It’s only one morning as I am up early with baby Maia that I start to wonder why, at 6am, he is there. My aunt is making him a packed lunch and he is brushing his teeth. He is dressed in his school uniform, the standard deep red shorts and a white shirt. His young face freckled, and dark hair bleached from the sun. All I know about him is that he lives next door.

I start to ponder on why he’s here so early. Maybe they don’t have running water next door or perhaps he needs to use the fridge because they don’t have one…

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About Robertico (part 2)


The day Robertico is crying, desperate and lonely outside my window, I don’t want to go but I must. To witness it makes me sick. It unnerves me but here it is common. ‘Abuela’ (grandma), he calls not wanting to enter the house. He calls my aunt this even though she is not a relation at all. He clings to the pole on the terrace that supports the roof. He cries a cry that I’ve come to recognise here.

It’s a cry of fear. More like a small animal in pain than a child crying. It’s more basic than when they fall over and more desperate than when they fight with other children. I always turn instinctively towards it. In the street, the sound as I walk past houses rising up through the wall of heat. Startled, I always raise my head towards the window. I always wish I hadn’t.

The first time I heard it I was walking back home with Eleanor and Maia from their grandmother’s house. It is late afternoon and I need to bath them to alleviate the heat. Robertico’s house sits next to ours. It’s a small, square single room made up of grey, wooden planks, bleached and peeling from the harsh sun and rain. The heavy wooden door of his house screams open, the wood scrapping against the stone floor. He comes running from his house crying. Wearing only his worn, yellow underpants, his skinny, boyish body exposed and vulnerable, cowering in the bright sun. Bare feet on the hot dirt road, the dust rising up behind him in a plume. He has an arm crossed protectively across his torso. The day is hot. He enters our house. I think nothing of it. He’d been up all night with a fever. I’d been told he’d eaten too many plums.

As we step through the front door I hear him crying in desperation in the back yard. I begin to step out onto the porch to see if I can help. Three of them round the corner into my sight. Robertico is between his mother and my aunt. He is begging, tears wetting his face. My aunt is holding him with one arm trying to calm him. His mother is delivering karate blows to his body. It’s a slicing movement of the hand to the arm or body (usually the arm). I usher the girls inside so as not to witness it. He is dragged back to his house, my aunt left standing at our gate. She cannot get involved further. He did not want to eat dinner.

Late in the night he’s taken to the dr who confirms a stomach bug.

The cry becomes imprinted and I hear it in Santiago as we walk through the streets. I hear it in Bayamo as we return home after watching The Band in the square. I hear it in Havana as we walk to meet Diego from work. I look up at the windows, always a child, always a slice, always a mother.

clippedwingsflying

The day Robertico is crying, desperate and lonely outside my window, I don’t want to go but I must. To witness it makes me sick. It unnerves me but here it is common. ‘Abuela,’ he calls not wanting to enter the house. He calls my aunt this even though she is not a relation at all. He clings to the pole on the terrace that supports the roof. He cries a cry that I’ve come to recognise here.

It’s a cry of fear. More like a small animal in pain than a child crying. It’s more basic than when they fall over and more desperate than when they fight with other children. I always turn instinctively towards it. In the street, the sound as I walk pass houses rising up through the wall of heat. Startled, I always raise my head towards the window. I always wish I hadn’t.

The…

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she swallows the night in a sunflower dress and no shoes, weeping for her homeland and the impossible dream of freedom


In the shadows of

a decaying bar

she breathes cigars

and Cuba Libre.

While a guitar plays

Guananey she swallows

the night in a sunflower

dress and no shoes,

weeping for her homeland

and the impossible

dream of freedom.

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“NO”, Lack of protest or resistance does not mean consent, nor does silence mean consent


MYTH: Women say ‘no’ when they mean ‘yes’.
TRUTH: When a woman says ‘no’, it means ‘no’.
MYTH: Silence mean consent.
TRUTH: Lack of protest or resistance does not mean consent, nor does silence mean consent.

A significant number of sexual harassment and rape cases can be reduced if people understood the above two points.

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beside obama tomorrow


Katrice Mubiru, of Woodland Heights, California. Mubiru, a career-technical education teacher in Los Angeles, encouraged Obama in a letter to support K-12 adult and career technical education. She introduced Obama last year when he visited Los Angeles Trade-Technical College to promote technical skills programs.
– Astrid Muhammad, of Charlotte, North Carolina. Muhammad, a wife and mother of two, wrote to thank Obama for signing the Affordable Care Act. She obtained coverage under the law last year and had surgery to remove a potentially fatal brain tumor that was diagnosed when she had no health insurance.
– Carolyn Reed, of Denver. Reed described for Obama how she expanded her submarine sandwich shop business with a government loan. Obama dined last year with Reed and other Coloradans who wrote to him. Reed also told the president she was raising her hourly employees’ wages to $10.10.
-Ana Zamora, of Dallas. A student at Northwood University, Zamora was brought to the United States illegally as a child and has benefited under Obama’s program to defer deportations for eligible immigrants. Zamora wrote Obama about her experience and says her parents will also be eligible for protection under his recent executive actions on immigration.
The remaining guests are:
– Chelsey Davis, of Knoxville, Tennessee. Davis is scheduled to graduate in May from Pellissippi State Community College. She met Obama when he visited her school this month to announce a plan to pay for two years of community college for students who keep up their grades.
– LeDaya Epps, of Compton, California. The mother of three completed a union apprenticeship in construction and is on the crew building the Crenshaw/LAX light rail line. Obama has promoted apprenticeships as a way for people to get training for skilled jobs.
– Nicole Hernandez Hammer, of southeast Florida. The sea-level researcher studies how cities and other areas most vulnerable to the effects of climate change also have large Hispanic populations. She works to raise Latinos’ awareness of climate change. Obama has taken steps to address climate change.
– Anthony Mendez, of New York City. The University of Hartford freshman once had to rise at 4:30 a.m. to get to school after his family was evicted and living in a homeless shelter hours away. Mendez was among students who met Mrs. Obama last year. She spearheads an initiative encouraging students to pursue education after high school.
– Kathy Pham, of Washington, D.C. Pham is a government computer scientist who works to improve health information technology, expand access to benefits for veterans and improve how government provides services.
-Capt. Phillip C. Tingirides, of Irvine, California. A husband and father of six, the veteran Los Angeles police officer heads the Community Safety Partnership program in the neighborhood of Watts, once scarred by race riots and subsequent gang violence. Police engage with residents under the program.
– Catherine Pugh, of Baltimore. Pugh is majority leader of the Maryland Senate and helped pass legislation increasing the state minimum wage to $10.10. She has also introduced legislation to provide workers with earned paid sick leave. Both are issues Obama is pushing at the federal level.
– Dr. Pranav Shetty, of Washington, D.C. Shetty is the global emergency health coordinator for International Medical Corps, a partner in the U.S.-backed effort to control the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Shetty went to Liberia in August, returned to the U.S. last month and heads back to West Africa this week.
– Prophet Walker, of Carson, California. While serving time for robbery, Walker started a prison program to help fellow inmates earn a two-year degree. After prison, he became a construction engineer and has worked to improve relations among law enforcement, community activists, parents and the children of local housing projects.
-Tiairris Woodward, of Warren, Michigan. Woodward started a second job working on Chrysler’s assembly line in 2010 to help support herself and three children, including one with special needs. She eventually began working only for Chrysler and after a year had saved enough money to buy a car and rent a new apartment. The company’s tuition assistance program is aiding her pursuit of a bachelor’s degree in business management. The White House says her story is possible due to the comeback of Detroit and the U.S. auto industry.


Follow Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap

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even China is falling


While 7% growth would be the envy of most economies, Beijing says at least this level is needed to create enough jobs for China’s huge population. The Communist Party sees social stability as an essential component in maintaining its grip on power.


China’s National Bureau of Statistics said Jan. 20 that GDP growth in 2014 was 7.4%, the lowest annual growth since 1990. It also missed the country’s target of 7.5% growth, the first time that has happened since 1999. GDP in the fourth quarter was 7.3% the agency also said.

The International Monetary Fund, Jan. 20, cut its global economic growth forecast for 2015-16 by 0.3 % to 3.5% and 3.7%, respectively. The revision came after reassessing economic prospects in China, Russia, the euro zone, and Japan as well as weaker economic activity in some major oil exporting countries, the IMF said.

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CAPITALISM|O


El primer deber de todo humano  |-|  The first duty of a Human,
es pensar por si mismo —————|—| is to have his own thought

José Martí

***

Son muchos los que querrán reducirte a sus pensamientos, caprichos, complejos, …

por eso me gusta el Capitalismo, en él eres libre de ir a donde quieras y nadie puede aplastarte, sólo en él puedes ser tu mismo.

Dime si encuentras algún rostro libre en esta foto:

IMG_0039.PNG

Wrong Way Gang

The first duty of a man is to think for himself.

José Martí

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